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What can be done about Sudan's deepening humanitarian catastrophe? | Brookings

What can be done about Sudan's deepening humanitarian catastrophe? | Brookings
The Horn of Africa, home to over 200 million people, is experiencing high levels of fragility from both violence and climate change. The World Food Program says that the current conflict in Sudan is “risking the world's largest hunger crisis across the region." Jeffrey Feltman, visiting fellow in International Diplomacy in the Strobe Talbott Center for Security, Strategy, and Technology at Brookings, joins The Current to talk about the humanitarian and security crisis unfolding in Sudan and the Horn of Africa.

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The Horn of Africa is facing a severe humanitarian and security crisis, with Sudan at the epicenter. The conflict in Sudan is causing a hunger crisis, with nearly 18 million people facing acute hunger and over 9 million displaced. Jeffrey Feltman, a visiting fellow at the Strobe Talbott Center for Security, Strategy, and Technology at Brookings, discusses the situation in Sudan and the Horn of Africa. The crisis is manmade, with internal conflicts and outside actors exacerbating the situation. The international community needs to acknowledge the famine-like conditions and work to deliver humanitarian assistance to those in need. The U.S. has pledged over $300 million for the humanitarian appeal for Sudan, but more needs to be done to address the crisis. The situation in Sudan is a tragic betrayal of the grassroots movements that led to the overthrow of Omar Bashir, and more engagement and pressure on outside actors is needed to address the deepening humanitarian catastrophe.

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