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The ‘Washington Post March’ needed an update. I tried using AI to replace it.

The ‘Washington Post March’ needed an update. I tried using AI to replace it.
With apps like Suno, it’s never been easier to generate “new” music on the fly -- for better or worse.

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A new app called Suno has been making waves in the music industry, allowing users to generate tunes using AI. The app has been the subject of a lawsuit by record companies, who claim that Suno's tool can only generate tunes because it used their copyrighted songs to learn how. Despite the legal battle, the app remains live and free to download. Users have been experimenting with the app, creating songs with specific prompts and styles. However, concerns have been raised about the ethical implications of using AI to create music that sounds similar to existing artists. There are also worries that record labels could pitch their copyright song catalogues to AI companies in return for access to models that can create synthetic music without paying royalties. The future of AI music remains uncertain, but it's clear that the music industry and consumers will have to grapple with its implications.

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