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Moving forward on the path to deforestation-free supply chains

Moving forward on the path to deforestation-free supply chains
China's recent international commitments and domestic approaches to mitigating the environmental and social threats associated with global deforestation are plentiful but not sufficient, especially when compared to its peer and competitor, the EU. Our innovative flashcards provide key recommendations on how to strengthen the systematic approach to curate further dialogue and co-operation with stakeholders, especially by highlighting the key ministries' roles in greening the global supply chain. Ultimately, we encourage China to advance its commitment and policy to reduce global deforestation resulting from soft commodity supply chains.

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The European Union is taking steps to pursue deforestation-free supply chains through legislation, with the EU Timber regulations (EUTR) already in place for over a decade and the EU Deforestation Regulation (EUDR) set to come into force at the end of 2024. This will impact commodities such as beef, leather, soybeans, and oil, which can only be sold in the EU if they are deforestation-free and comply with local laws. China, a major player in the international market for soft commodities, has close trade links to the EU and producing countries like Brazil. The global demand for soft commodities is driving deforestation, turning ecosystems from carbon sinks to carbon sources. This resource focuses on China's international commitments and domestic approaches to mitigate environmental and social threats associated with global deforestation, providing recommendations to strengthen dialogue and cooperation with stakeholders. The goal is to encourage China to advance its commitment and policies to reduce global deforestation through supply chains.

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