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1D Metallic Gate Electrodes for Ultra-Miniature Transistors

1D Metallic Gate Electrodes for Ultra-Miniature Transistors
A team of scientists from the Institute for Basic Science has developed a revolutionary technique for producing 1D metallic materials with a width of less than 1 nm by epitaxial growth.

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A team of scientists from the Institute for Basic Science has developed a groundbreaking technique for producing 1D metallic materials with a width of less than 1 nm by epitaxial growth. This new method allowed the team to create a new architecture for 2D semiconductor logic circuits, using the 1D metals as the ultra-miniaturized transistor's gate electrode. The research was published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

Led by Director Moon-Ho Jo of the Center for Van der Waals Quantum Solids, the team overcame significant technical obstacles to realize ultra-miniaturized transistor devices that can regulate the movement of electrons within a few nm. They used molybdenum disulfide, a 2D semiconductor, to create a 1D mirror twin boundary (MTB) that is a 1D metal with a width of only 0.4 nm, which they employed as a gate electrode.

The team's 1D MTB-based transistor has benefits for improved circuit performance, as it can reduce parasitic capacitance due to its incredibly low gate width and straightforward construction. This new material process is expected to become a key technology for developing various low-power, high-performance electronic devices in the future.

The study team's findings are detailed in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

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